In Review: Midnite Show #1

Basil Saxon is a legend among horror fans. Over fifty years ago, he vanished during a freak accident on the set of the film that would have been his masterpiece.
Midnite

Synopsis: In Midnite Show Basil Saxon is a legend among horror fans. Over fifty years ago, he vanished during a freak accident on the set of the film that would have been his masterpiece. The cursed film—God of Monsters—was never completed and has never been seen. But when a film festival shows footage from the long-lost movie, classic horror monsters manifest to wreak havoc and terror on the unsuspecting populace. A ragtag group of misfits must band together to stop the most famous creatures of all time and send them back to the realm of celluloid nightmares.

 

The Story

A horror festival celebrating the work of the late great director, writer, and actor Basil Saxon hosts the work premier of his final movie ‘God of Monsters’. To say that horror fans are soiling their pants would be an understatement as we see a fan waxing lyrical to his girlfriend about the movie, which is basically a Dracula movie that unites all the monsters of 1950s cinema. The press and online influencers are really pumping up the publicity for this show, but while people are enjoying the film. The movie’s monsters begin to invade the real world as we see a group of fishermen get attacked by a swamp-like creature. And Dracula himself prepares to strike an unsuspecting horror fan who has delusions of granger.

 

The Artwork

The art style for this book felt a little unusual to me at first as the first couple of pages are on the set of ‘God of Monsters’ while it is being made. So we are sort of seeing the artist’s interpretation of a 1950s horror movie. This was a rather cool visual as we even had a pretty cool color wash that really felt truthful to the time period.

That said. The drawings of the 1950s monsters are quite accurate and fun. Other than Dracula who reminded me more of the 1930s Bela Legosi incarnation than the version that was played by the late Christopher Lee who was probably the most popular Vampire of the 1950s. Although Brian Hurtt interpretation of Dracula might have been based on a combination of John Carradine and Christopher Lee who are probably the two most prominent actors to play the vampire in the 1950s. Regardless Hurtt draws a really cool vampire.

 

Overall

Cullen Bunn kicks this story off in style and gets right to the throat. The concept of monsters coming into the real world from movie screens isn’t a new one. But as I always say. It is how the writer frames the story that counts and Bunn frames his story really well. I’m quite looking forward to the second issue of this.

9
Midnite Show #1
  • Covers
    8.6
  • Story
    8.7
  • Artwork
    9.0
  • Lettering
    9.4
  • Colours
    9.1

Ian Cullen is the founder of scifipulse.net and has been a fan of science fiction and fantasy from birth. In the past few years he has written for 'Star Trek' Magazine as well as interviewed numerous comics writers, television producers and actors for the SFP-NOW podcast at: www.scifipulseradio.com When he is not writing for scifipulse.net Ian enjoys playing his guitar, studying music, watching movies and reading his comics. Ian is both the founder and owner of scifipulse.net You can contact ian at: ian@scifipulse.net
No Comment
SciFiPulse.Net