Graham Hancock: Ancient Apocalypse – One to Watch . . .

British author Graham Hancock has a new eight-part documentary series on Netflix — Ancient Apocalypse. For SciFiPulse I’m here to give you the lowdown on it and give my...
Graham Hancock

British author Graham Hancock has a new eight-part documentary series on Netflix — Ancient Apocalypse. For SciFiPulse I’m here to give you the lowdown on it and give my view as to why, in my opinion, it’s well worth a watch.

 

Background on Graham Hancock

 

Graham Hancock writes and investigates the human story. He questions established narratives and the apparent “irrefutable” timeline of history. His work has attracted much criticism, and also ridicule. It’s important to state he’s not a “conspiracy theorist” and doesn’t simply pull his arguments and theories out of the sky. He’s also not a populist and doesn’t simply want to sell books. Far from it. Graham Hancock cares passionately about his work. His best-known book is Fingerprints of The Gods (1995). In short, he believes that there may be a lost civilisation, which would explain quite a lot. And he believes they may well have attempted to warn us of certain things . . .

 

The Series

The central argument presented in the series focuses on The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis. It’s a period of the Earth’s history that brought about sudden, violent ecological activity. Some believe that it may have been caused by a massive asteroid impact. Graham Hancock is among them. More specifically, he believes that this may well have given rise to the many “great flood myths” that are ubiquitous across many cultures’ earliest known records.

Additionally, throughout the series, there are questions that concern how it can be that there are so many similarities in the details of such stories. Some certainly appear remarkably alike. But that’s not all. He travels around a great many ancient sites, around the globe. And it’s not only apparent holy monuments are investigated and scrutinised. For example, Derinkuyu Underground Ancient City is visited. The very purpose of its construction is reconsidered.

 

Implications

Potentially, we’re in trouble. Big trouble! Graham Hancock takes available data and extrapolates that a huge, possibly cataclysmic event might be coming. What he states, which is a recurrent theme of his work, is that we simply write off the possible warnings that are in many, many myths. However, what’s compelling is the basis for this argument. There are a great many questions that archaeology seems to struggle to provide definitive answers for. He doesn’t ever claim to be able to give any indisputable solutions to this. But he does offer fresh perspectives that may help.

A summary of what’s purported is well captured in the following statement: if we don’t understand the past, we can’t know about the future. Of course, this assumes that “the ancients” had much greater knowledge than they’re credited with. Furthermore, we might not be able to afford to ignore them!  Watch and decide that for yourself . . .

 

**The views and leanings do not represent any official view of SciFiPulse. They’re those of the feature’s author.

 

 

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