In Review: Pixels

The films humour is pretty much low brow. Kids will love it, but I do have to question whether or not sly innuendo's towards sexual threesomes and some of the creepier humour would be suitable

Synopsis: When aliens intercept video feeds of classic arcade games and misinterpret them as a declaration of war, they attack Earth, using the games as models. Knowing that he must employ a similar strategy, President Will Cooper (Kevin James) recruits his childhood pal, former video-game champ and home-theater installer Sam Brenner (Adam Sandler), to lead a team of old-school arcade players and a military specialist (Michelle Monaghan) in an all-out battle to save the planet.

Review: This is one of the films that I never got round to going to the cinema to see during the cinema and in a way I’m glad I didn’t because its basically just an average run of the mill Adam Sandler movie in which he once again plays a adolescent teenager stuck in a grown man’s body.

When I saw the trailer for this earlier this year. I thought it’d be a fun movie and it was, but that was mostly down to the nostalgia factor of seeing loads of classic video games characters from 80’s video games and of course some of the 80’s songs that make up the films soundtrack.

The films humour is pretty much low brow. Kids will love it, but I do have to question whether or not sly innuendo’s towards sexual threesomes and some of the creepier humour would be suitable, but I guess that would be a judgement call for the parent.

The knock around comedy between Sandler and Michelle Monaghan works pretty well and they establish a pretty good on-screen chemistry pretty early in the film.

I remember a friend of mine when first seeing the trailer calling it as a potential contender to be as good as the original ‘Ghostbusters’. Sadly this wasn’t the case. I can’t actually see myself or anyone wanting to revisit this film half as much as they would ‘Ghostbusters’.  Though fans of the ‘Ghostbusters’ franchise might get a kick out of Dan Aykroydd’s brief role at the very start of the movie.

Kids will probably get a kick out of grown men beating up old video games with light guns, but I think a lot will probably instantly fall in love with Q-Bert who comes to life in the film as one of the trophies that our unlikely heroes win when taking on the video game invaders.

When this was released it got some scathing reviews from Rotten Tomatoes and many other websites. I think many of these was probably due to a great deal of expectation that the movie had placed on it. It could have been much better than it was, but I don’t think it was anywhere near as bad as most reviews cited. I’ve certainly seen worse movies with Adam Sandler. ‘Switch’ kind of springs to mind.

Much ado is made of the fact that Adam Sandler and Kevin James led this movie, but for me it is Peter Dinklage as the cheating criminal former donkey kong champion that sort of steals it from them.  Dinklage’s scene with Serena Willams was sort of priceless from both a visual point of view as well as the oh my god did he really say that moment. 

Overall ‘Pixels’ is not perfect and I can’t see it standing up to repeat viewings, but for what it is. Its a fun hour and 45 minutes for fans of 80’s games and gross out humour.

Pixels is available to buy now on both DVD and Blue Ray as well as via streaming services.

7.8
Pixels
  • Great CGI and Seeing Donkey Kong again.
  • Some of the more adult innuendo based humour may not be suited to younger viewers.
  • Story
    6.5
  • Acting
    7.5
  • CGI
    9.0
  • Incidental Music
    8.0

Ian Cullen is the founder of scifipulse.net and has been a fan of science fiction and fantasy from birth.

In the past few years he has written for ‘Star Trek’ Magazine as well as interviewed numerous comics writers, television producers and actors for the SFP-NOW podcast at: www.scifipulseradio.com

When he is not writing for scifipulse.net Ian enjoys playing his guitar, studying music, watching movies and reading his comics.

Ian is both the founder and owner of scifipulse.net

You can contact ian at: [email protected]

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