In Review: Grimm, Episode 69 “Thanks for the Memories”

I am liking the possibility of Nick being powerless for some time and exploring what it's like to be normal again.

Grimm, Episode “Thanks for the Memoires” Broadcast October 24, 2014

Written by Jim Kouf & David Greenwalt

Directed by Norberto Barba

After a recap of last season’s finale, Captain Renard is seen entering the ER in critical condition. He was shot three times in the chest and his future is looking uncertain. While this is going on, Nick, Juliette, Hank, and Trouble are driving back to Nick and Juliette’s house, since that’s where the captain was shot and where Trouble left the decapitated body of the man wielding the gun. As they make their way they all play plot catch up: Adalind transformed herself into Juliette so Nick would have sex with her so she could gain another element for a potion she created to have him lose his Grimm abilities. Nick no longer can detect Wesen and has lost all heightened speed and senses. As this dawns on them, Hank reminds them they better get their stories straight because if they’re going to lie to the police they had better be telling the same story. As they make the final turn to the house, they see several squad cars parked outside. The action then goes outside a home where a man stands across the street holding two suitcases. A series of seemingly painful flashbacks occur before him, including a child, a woman, a computer screen, and military planes. Shaking if off, he walks to the door and knocks. He gains entrance from Henry Slocombe after mentioning they have a mutual friend who’s been in an accident. As this stranger, Laurence Anderson, describes the friend’s accident he begins to sweat profusely. He walks to Slocombe and changes into his Wesen form, a humanoid with a squid head, complete with four waving tentacles. He grabs the man and his tentacles plunge into the back of Slocombe’s head. Cue opening title sequence and first commercial break.

This episode pushes the plot arc forward while giving some good character growth to Wu and Trouble. The latter gets the biggest jump because she’s now the only Grimm in the area. She takes this responsibility seriously, studying more from the books, and being overly pleased at being able to do things that once Nick took charge of. Jacqueline Toboni got a lot of screen time and looked to be enjoying it. The only clunky moment came outside of Grandma’s trailer, but that seemed more of a directorial misstep. Reggie Lee also is getting more to do, as Wu has discovered one of the Grimm books during the investigation of the crime scene at Nick and Juliette’s house. Wu has a dark cloud over his face as he peruses each page, obviously thinking of the incident that had him check himself into a mental facility after killing a Wesen. He is doubting Nick at every turn and is facing some major turmoil. Hank wants to help, but doesn’t know what to say or reveal. The most enjoyable character turn came from Juliette who is the stronger character in her relationship with Nick, because she makes choices that show she’s grown from previous seasons. When Nick suggests he sleep on the sofa after what he’s done, she responds with, “We’re not doing that again.” Thank you, Kouf and Greenwalt! I especially liked the scene set on the living room floor.

There were a few weak spots. The inclusion of newlyweds Monroe and Rosalee added nothing to the scene or story. The information that they provided could have been given in the next episode, as nothing comes of their knowledge in this episode. They seemed to be fulfilling contract obligations. Russell Hornsby was reacting more than acting, though the tease with Hank and Wu has me eager for him to spill the beans. David Giuntoli did a lot of staring into empty space, as Nick is reacting to the loss of his powers. Only his moments with Juliette were good. The FBI agent wasn’t really a surprise, but what she did with some information left me at a loss. The one clunky line comes from the last officer to leave Nick and Juliette’s, “Sorry about the mess.” I groaned at that.

The good: Reggie Lee, Jacqueline Toboni, Bitsie Tulloch, and the double cliffhanger.

The bad: Nick and Hank not doing much and Monroe and Rosalee present to be present.

The final line: I am liking the possibility of Nick being powerless for some time and exploring what it’s like to be normal again. The show is Grimm and that doesn’t mean it has to be Nick. I’m also liking the Wesen and being unclear as to what it’s transporting. Enjoyable season opener. Overall grade: B  

 

Patrick Hayes was a contributor to the Comic Buyer’s Guide for several years with “It’s Bound to Happen!”, he reviewed comics for TrekWeb, and he currently reviews Trek comics at TrekCore. He’s taught 8th graders English for 20 years and has taught high school English for two years and counting. He reads everything as often as he can, when not grading papers or looking up Star Trek, Star Wars, or Indiana Jones items online.

Patrick Hayes was a contributor to the Comic Buyer's Guide for several years with "It's Bound to Happen!" and he's reviewed comics for TrekWeb and TrekCore. He's taught 8th graders English for 20 years and has taught high school English for five years and counting. He reads everything as often as he can, when not grading papers or looking up Star Trek, Star Wars, or Indiana Jones items online.
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