In Review: Edward Scissorhands #1

The story continues in the same delightfully whimsical and touching fashion of the film. An outstanding comic for all.

The covers: Five different images to grace the front of your book. The A cover is by Gabriel Rodriguez with a terrific shot of Edward before the gigantic ice sculpture of Kim’s head. This is wonderful front piece with perfect coloring. Love the background on this, too. The Subscription cover is by Gabriel Hardman and this is a photorealistic image of Edward on the grounds of his creator’s mansion. This is also a fantastic illustration with sensational coloring. I love seeing this protagonist’s complete figure and that beautifully gothic home. The RI cover is by interior artist Drew Rausch. This is a cartoony Edward that captures the whimsy, sadness, and allure of the character. This is perfect. The Convention variant cover is Rodriguez’s A cover without the colors. I’m a big fan of this type of variant as it allows fans to peek at what the artist did before colors were applied. It makes me appreciate the artist and colorist all the more. The final cover is the Hot Topic variant, also by Rausch, with Edward trimming hedges with Kim’s ice sculpture dancing behind him. The sadness on his face makes this really tug at my heart strings. Overall grades: A A, Subscription A+, RI A+, Convention A, and Hot Topic A

The story: There are some questions every reader will probably ask before opening this book: Is it sweet? Is it sad? Is it necessary? The answers are yes, yes, and yes. I am a huge fan of the film, my family loves this movie. It’s one movie that we can all bond over. Kate Leth’s story continues Edward’s saga in the perfect tandem with the tone of the film that inspired it. It’s been almost five years since Kimberly Boggs (Winona Ryder’s character) has passed away. It hasn’t snowed upon the suburbs since she’s died. This notification instantly touched a nerve in me, and watching Edward sculpt during this revelation hooked me completely. Edward gets a daily newspaper and posts his favorite clippings on the wall, which has one panel that made both my daughters “Aw” with sympathy. Puttering around the empty home, Edward goes to his creator’s notebook, staring silently at the diagrams that led to his creation. He comes across a surprising word which drives the rest of his story. What he discovers on Page 6 shouldn’t be surprising, but what comes of it will cause shivers waiting for next month’s issue. Page 8 introduces readers to Megs, Kim’s granddaughter she is telling Edward’s tale to at the end of the film. Now a high school student, she and her mother have a conflict regarding Kim that’s harsh, yet believable. This conflict sets Megs on a path of action that should lead her to a famous setting. I love this story and so did my children. It’s the only comic book we’ve jointly enjoyed. For that I’m really grateful to Ms. Leth. Overall grade: A+

The art: Drew Rausch is credited as the artist, and since there’s no stated colorist I’m going to assume he did this duty as well. Rausch is the perfect artist for this book. Edward Scissorhands should have a fantasy flair to it, yet capture the harsh counter of the “real” world. In the first page Rausch captures the setting, emotion, character, and feel of the film flawlessly. The sad look on Edward’s face does the exact same job in telegraphing his unstated emotions as Johnny Depp did in the film. Panel five on this page is a wonderful introduction to the four words in that panel. This is not a mopey, continually weepy Edward; his look at the end of the second page brightens the entire previous sequence. There’s also fantastic coloring in the sixth panel on that page that emphasizes the world he can never return to. The second panel on Page 4 is hilarious and the entire sequence on 5 spectacular. The normal world also looks great and I love the mouths on 8, with the one in the final panel inducing giggles. The design of Megs and her mom are spot on: and their fingers are fabulous! Now if a readers should think this will be a “touchy-feely” book, the final page has such ominous imagery, with terrifyingly bright reds, that foreshadows impending neighborhood terrors, any concerns of a one-note book are cut to pieces. I love the look of this comic. Overall grade: A+ 

The letters: Completing the excellence on this book is the lettering from Travis Lanham. There are many unique fonts including narration and dialogue (the same design), a beautiful font for Edward’s speech (he does talk!), perfect sound effects, harsh yelling, and a journal entry. Each is wonderful with Edward’s speech being the absolute focus of every panel it occurs in. Overall grade: A+

The final line: The story continues in the same delightfully whimsical and touching fashion of the film. An outstanding comic for all. Overall grade: A+

 

Patrick Hayes was a contributor to the Comic Buyer’s Guide for several years with “It’s Bound to Happen!”, he reviewed comics for TrekWeb, and he currently reviews Trek comics at TrekCore. He’s taught 8th graders English for 20 years and has taught high school English for two years and counting. He reads everything as often as he can, when not grading papers or looking up Star Trek, Star Wars, or Indiana Jones items online.

Patrick Hayes was a contributor to the Comic Buyer's Guide for several years with "It's Bound to Happen!" and he's reviewed comics for TrekWeb and TrekCore. He's taught 8th graders English for 20 years and has taught high school English for five years and counting. He reads everything as often as he can, when not grading papers or looking up Star Trek, Star Wars, or Indiana Jones items online.
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