In Review: American Gods – Come to Jesus

On the eve of war, Mr. Wednesday must recruit one more Old God: Ostara, né Easter, Goddess of the Dawn

Synopsis: On the eve of war, Mr. Wednesday must recruit one more Old God: Ostara, né Easter, Goddess of the Dawn But winning her over will require making a good impression, and that is where Mr. Nancy comes in.

Review: The season one finale leaves us in suspense for more, but unfortunately we’ll have to wait until next year to see all the fall out.

The episode starts off with Wednesday and Shadow getting some suits made by Mr Nancy.

While they are waiting Mr Nancy tells them a story about how Goddess Bilquis was worshipped and fell out of favour only to be saved by social media. Which was introduced to her by Technology Boy. It seems that this is a cautionary tale or Nancy trying to give Wednesday some insight about what he is up against.

Orlando Jones puts in a brilliant performance as Mr Nancy who has been used sparingly this season, but will likely have a bigger role in season two.

We also see a great performance from Kristin Chenoweth as Goddess of the Dawn Ostara.

In fact Ostara pretty much takes centre stage for best part of this episode and shares some fabulous scenes with Ian McShane, Emily Browning and Gillian Anderson.

The fun about meeting Ostara is the fact that as the Goddess of the Dawn and Easter. The producers could play around a lot with bunny rabbits and various different variations of Jesus. Who were all in attendance at her annual party.

By the time we get to the reveal that Ostara or Easter has been getting help from Media. Its pretty much obvious and sign posted. So doesn’t come as a great surprise.

What is good though is the way in which Wednesday manages to recruit her by pretty much showing the new gods to be fickle and shallow. I particularly enjoyed the analogy about us mere mortals not having to worship anymore because we have freezers and microwaves.

Emily Browning also has a really powerful scene in this when she finds out that Ostara can’t help her. Hell not even the many Jesus’s can help. This was a fun episode, which gave all the actors some pretty decent dialogue to play with. As mentioned above. I loved Wednesday’s speech and the argument that he uses to recruit Ostara right from under the new Gods.

If I have one criticism of the series. It seems to have been highly character driven with very little in the way of plot to drive it forward. It very much felt like the producers were adding stuff to pad it out and stretch the series out. The penultimate episode involving Essie being an example.

Essie may have worked great in the book. But an entire episode I felt was a little overkill.

I really hope this is something that changes in the second series.

 

9.8
American Gods - Come to Jesus
  • Story
    9.3
  • Acting
    10
  • CGI
    9.8
  • Incidental Music
    10

Ian Cullen is the founder of scifipulse.net and has been a fan of science fiction and fantasy from birth. In the past few years he has written for 'Star Trek' Magazine as well as interviewed numerous comics writers, television producers and actors for the SFP-NOW podcast at: www.scifipulseradio.com When he is not writing for scifipulse.net Ian enjoys playing his guitar, studying music, watching movies and reading his comics. Ian is both the founder and owner of scifipulse.net You can contact ian at: ian@scifipulse.net
One Comment
  • Raissa Devereux (@RaissaDevereux)
    19 June 2017 at 4:20 pm -

    The book is very character driven. This adaptation is an improvement. In the novel, Mad Sweeney and Bilquis are eliminated by now. Nancy isn’t introduced until later, and Laura’s accident is just that — an accident. Plus, Easter’s role, why VERY pivotal, doesn’t pay off until the end. You can tell Gaiman understood the structural shortcomings of his work and saw Starz’ offer as an opportunity.

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